Wood County Current Events

Ebola Information
Posted 10/16/2014 by schristensen@co.wood.wi.us
General
How do I protect myself against Ebola?

If you must travel to an area affected by the 2014 Ebola outbreak, protect yourself by doing the following:

Wash hands frequently or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
Avoid contact with blood and body fluids of any person, particularly someone who is sick.
Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person’s blood or body fluids.
Do not touch the body of someone who has died from Ebola.
Do not touch bats and nonhuman primates or their blood and fluids and do not touch or eat raw meat prepared from these animals.
Avoid hospitals in West Africa where Ebola patients are being treated. The U.S. Embassy or consulate is often able to provide advice on medical facilities.
Seek medical care immediately if you develop fever (temperature of 100.4°F/ 38.0°C or higher) and any of the other following symptoms: headache, muscle pain, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, or unexplained bruising or bleeding.
Limit your contact with other people until and when you go to the doctor. Do not travel anywhere else besides a healthcare facility.
For general information about Ebola, please use the links below:

About EbolaSigns and SymptomsTransmissionRisk of ExposurePrevention
CDC has issued a Warning, Level 3 travel notice for U.S. citizens to avoid nonessential travel to Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. CDC has downgraded the travel notice for Nigeria to a Watch, Level 1 because of the decreased risk of Ebola in Nigeria. Travelers to Nigeria should practice usual precautions. CDC has also issued an Alert, Level 2 travel notice for the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). A small number of Ebola cases have been reported in the DRC, though current information indicates that this outbreak is not related to the ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For travel notices and other information for travelers, visit the Travelers’ Health Ebola web page.

Has the first patient to become sick in this outbreak, know as “patient zero” been identified?

Reports in the medical literature and elsewhere have attempted to identify the patient who might have been the initial person infected in the West Africa Ebola outbreak. It’s important for CDC to learn as much as it can about the source and initial spread of any outbreak.

With regard to the West Africa Ebola outbreak, tracing the lineage of how Ebola has spread thus far can help CDC apply that knowledge toward better prevention and care techniques. The knowledge gained in this work might entail details about specific patients. CDC generally refrains, however, from identifying particular patients in any aspect of an outbreak.

What is CDC doing in the U.S. about the outbreak in West Africa?

CDC has activated its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to help coordinate technical assistance and control activities with partners. CDC has deployed several teams of public health experts to the West Africa region and plans to send additional public health experts to the affected countries to expand current response activities.

If an ill traveler arrives in the U.S., CDC has protocols in place to protect against further spread of disease. These protocols include having airline crew notify CDC of ill travelers on a plane before arrival, evaluation of ill travelers, and isolation and transport to a medical facility if needed. CDC, along with Customs & Border Patrol, has also provided guidance to airlines for managing ill passengers and crew and for disinfecting aircraft. CDC has issued a Health Alert Notice reminding U.S. healthcare workers about the importance of taking steps to prevent the spread of this virus, how to test and isolate patients with suspected cases, and how to protect themselves from infection.

Infection Control
Can hospitals in the United States care for an Ebola patient?

Any U.S. hospital that is following CDC’s infection control recommendations and can isolate a patient in their own room‎ with a private bathroom is capable of safely managing a patient with Ebola.

Travelers
What is being done to prevent ill travelers in West Africa from getting on a plane?

In West Africa

CDC’s Division of Global Migration and Quarantine (DGMQ) is working with airlines, airports, and ministries of health to provide technical assistance for the development of exit screening and travel restrictions in the affected areas. This includes:

Assessing the ability of Ebola-affected countries and airports to conduct exit screening,
Assisting with development of exit screening protocols,
Training staff on exit screening protocols and appropriate PPE use, and
Training in-country staff to provide future trainings.
During Travel

CDC works with international public health organizations, other federal agencies, and the travel industry to identify sick travelers arriving in the United States and take public health actions to prevent the spread of communicable diseases. Airlines are required to report any deaths onboard or ill travelers meeting certain criteria to CDC before arriving into the United States, and CDC and its partners determine whether any public health action is needed. If a traveler is infectious or exhibiting symptoms during or after a flight, CDC will conduct an investigation of exposed travelers and work with the airline, federal partners, and state and local health departments to notify them and take any necessary public health action. When CDC receives a report of an ill traveler on a cruise or cargo ship, CDC officials work with the shipping line to make an assessment of public health risk and to coordinate any necessary response.

In the United States

CDC has staff working 24/7 at 20 Border Health field offices located in international airports and land borders. CDC staff are ready 24/7 to investigate cases of ill travelers on planes and ships entering the United States.

CDC works with partners at all ports of entry into the United States to help prevent infectious diseases from being introduced and spread in the United States. CDC works with Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services, state and local health departments, and local Emergency Medical Services staff.

Relatively few of the approximately 350 million travelers who enter the United States each year come from these countries. Secondly, most people who become infected with Ebola are those who live with or care for people who have already caught the disease and are showing symptoms. CDC and healthcare providers in the United States are prepared for the remote possibility that a traveler could get Ebola and return to the U.S. while sick.

What do I do if I’m returning to the U.S. from the area where the outbreak is occurring?

After you return, pay attention to your health.

Monitor your health for 21 days if you were in an area with an Ebola outbreak, especially if you were in contact with blood or body fluids, items that have come in contact with blood or body fluids, animals or raw meat, or hospitals where Ebola patients are being treated or participated in burial rituals.
Seek medical care immediately if you develop fever (temperature of 100.4°F/ 38.0°C or higher) and any of the following symptoms: headache, muscle pain, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, or unexplained bruising or bleeding.
Tell your doctor about your recent travel and your symptoms before you go to the office or emergency room. Advance notice will help your doctor care for you and protect other people who may be in the office.
What do I do if I am traveling to an area where the outbreak is occurring?

If you are traveling to an area where the Ebola outbreak is occurring, protect yourself by doing the following:

Wash your hands frequently or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
Avoid contact with blood and body fluids of any person, particularly someone who is sick.
Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person’s blood or body fluids.
Do not touch the body of someone who has died from Ebola.
Do not touch bats and nonhuman primates or their blood and fluids and do not touch or eat raw meat prepared from these animals.
Avoid hospitals in West Africa where Ebola patients are being treated. The U.S. Embassy or consulate is often able to provide advice on facilities.
Seek medical care immediately if you develop fever (temperature of 100.4°F/ 38.0°C) and any of the other following symptoms: headache, muscle pain, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, or unexplained bruising or bleeding.
Limit your contact with other people until and when you go to the doctor. Do not travel anywhere else besides a healthcare facility.
Should people traveling to Africa be worried about the outbreak?

Ebola has been reported in multiple countries in West Africa (see Affected Countries). CDC has issued a Warning, Level 3 travel notice for United States citizens to avoid all nonessential travel to Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. A small number of cases were recently reported in Nigeria, but the virus does not appear to have been widely spread. CDC has downgraded the travel notice for Nigeria to a Watch, Level 1 because of the decreased risk of Ebola in Nigeria. Travelers to Nigeria should practice usual precautions. CDC has also issued an Alert, Level 2 travel notice for the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). A small number of Ebola cases have been reported in the DRC, though current information indicates that this outbreak is not related to the ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa. You can find more information on these travel notices at http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices.

CDC currently does not recommend that travelers avoid visiting other African countries. Although spread to other countries is possible, CDC is working with the governments of affected countries to control the outbreak. Ebola is a very low risk for most travelers – it is spread through direct contact with the blood or other body fluids of a sick person, so travelers can protect themselves by avoiding sick people and hospitals in West Africa where patients with Ebola are being treated.

Why were the ill Americans with Ebola brought to the U.S. for treatment? How is CDC protecting the American public?

A U.S. citizen has the right to return to the United States. Although CDC can use several measures to prevent disease from being introduced in the United States, CDC must balance the public health risk to others with the rights of the individual. In this situation, the patients who came back to the United States for care were transported with appropriate infection control procedures in place to prevent the disease from being transmitted to others.

Ebola poses no substantial risk to the U.S. general population. CDC recognizes that Ebola causes a lot of public worry and concern, but CDC’s mission is to protect the health of all Americans, including those who may become ill while overseas. Ebola patients can be transported and managed safely when appropriate precautions are used.

What does CDC’s Travel Alert Level 3 mean to U.S. travelers?

CDC recommends that U.S. residents avoid nonessential travel to Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. If you must travel (for example, to do for humanitarian aid work in response to the outbreak) protect yourself by following CDC’s advice for avoiding contact with the blood and body fluids of people who are ill with Ebola. For more information about the travel alerts, see Travelers’ Health Ebola web page.

Travel notices are designed to inform travelers and clinicians about current health issues related to specific destinations. These issues may arise from disease outbreaks, special events or gatherings, natural disasters, or other conditions that may affect travelers’ health. A level 3 alert means that there is a high risk to travelers and that CDC advises that travelers avoid nonessential travel.

In the United States
Are there any cases of people contracting Ebola in the U.S.?

CDC confirmed on September 30, 2014, the first travel-associated case of Ebola to be diagnosed in the United States. The person traveled from West Africa to Dallas, Texas, and later sought medical care at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas after developing symptoms consistent with Ebola. The medical facility has isolated the patient. Based on the person’s travel history and symptoms, CDC recommended testing for Ebola.

CDC recognizes that even a single case of Ebola diagnosed in the United States raises concerns. Knowing the possibility exists, medical and public health professionals across the country have been preparing to respond. CDC and public health officials in Texas are taking precautions to identify people who have had close personal contact with the ill person and health care professionals have been reminded to use meticulous infection control at all times.

Is there a danger of Ebola spreading in the U.S.?

Ebola is not spread through casual contact; therefore, the risk of an outbreak in the U.S. is very low. We know how to stop Ebola’s further spread: thorough case finding, isolation of ill people, contacting people exposed to the ill person, and further isolation of contacts if they develop symptoms. The U.S. public health and medical systems have had prior experience with sporadic cases of diseases such as Ebola. In the past decade, the United States had 5 imported cases of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) diseases similar to Ebola (1 Marburg, 4 Lassa). None resulted in any transmission in the United States.

Are people who were on the plane with this patient at risk?

A person must have symptoms to spread Ebola to others. The ill person did not exhibit symptoms of Ebola during the flights from West Africa and CDC does not recommend that people on the same commercial airline flights undergo monitoring. The person reported developing symptoms five days after the return flight. CDC and public health officials in Texas are taking precautions to identify people who have had close personal contact with the ill person and health care professionals have been reminded to use meticulous infection control at all times.
Wood County Poster and Speaking Contests
Posted 10/14/2014 by tarnold@co.wood.wi.us
The Wood County Land Conservation Department will be holding its annual
Poster and Speaking Contest on January 30, 2015.

Posters are due January 30, 2015 to Wood County LCD.
The theme is “Local Heroes Your Hardworking Pollinators”.

The Speaking Contest will be held Thursday February 5, 2015, at Pittsville High School @6:00.
Entry forms are due by January 30, 2015.

For more information contact the Wood County Land Conservation Department at 715-421-8475
or email tarnold@co.wood.wi.us.
Stepping On- Upcoming Community Fall Prevention Program
Posted 10/7/2014 by krauter@co.wood.wi.us
The Aging & Disability Resource Center of Central Wisconsin, in partnership with the Wood County Health Department, will be offering a community fall prevention program in Wisconsin Rapids. Stepping On is an evidence-based, multi-factorial workshop designed for community dwelling older adults. The workshop meets for 2 hours, one day per week, for 7 weeks. The program begins Tuesday, October 14th from 1:30-3:30 PM and will meet every Tuesday until November 25th.

Participants learn:
•Strength and balance exercises and how to implement them into their daily routine
•Ways to improve the safety in their home
•Safe and proper footwear
•Proper medication management
•The role vision plays in keeping their balance
•Ways to stay safe when out and about in the community
•And most of all, participants learn from one another

Who can best benefit from the Stepping On workshop?
•Older adults (60+) who live in their own home or independent apartment
•Able to walk without the help of another person
•Do not use a walker, scooter or wheelchair most of the time indoors
•Cognitively intact

*A contribution of $10 is suggested, but not required.
National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week: October 19-25, 2014
Posted 10/6/2014 by krauter@co.wood.wi.us
Lead Free Kids for a Healthy Future

Today, childhood lead poisoning is considered the most preventable environmental disease among young children, yet approximately half a million U.S. children have blood lead levels above 5 micrograms per deciliter, the reference level at which Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), recommends public health actions be initiated. A simple blood test can prevent permanent damage that will last a lifetime. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), CDC, is committed to eliminating this burden to public health.
Infant Massage Classes Now Being Offered
Posted 9/18/2014 by krauter@co.wood.wi.us
Come and learn infant massage. Classes being offered Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday October 13, 14, 15th from 11:00am-Noon.

$15.00 for all three sessions. Scholarships are available.

Benefits of Infant Massage
 Promotes bonding and attachment
 Stimulates brain Development
 Helps baby sleep better
 Improves digestion and blood circulation
 Reduces incidence of SIDS
 And many more...

To Register, fill out a registration form or call (715) 421-8911.
Training Available: The ABC's of Behavior in Early Childhood
Posted 9/18/2014 by krauter@co.wood.wi.us
Understand what children are communicating
through their behaviors and how to effectively work through those challenging moments.

FREE OF CHARGE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED

Tuesday, November 11
MSTC Auditorium, Wisconsin Rapids
6:30-8:30pm

-OR-
Tuesday, November 18
Streitel Conference Center, Marshfield
6:30-8:30pm

To register please contact Childcaring by phone
at 715-423-4114 or 800-628-8534 or by email at: info@childcaring.org
Safe Kids Wood County Coalition Members
Child Passenger Safety Advocates Recognized
Posted 9/11/2014 by krauter@co.wood.wi.us
Green Bay, WI - The 40th annual Wisconsin Governor’s Conference on Highway Safety was held at the KI Convention Center in Green Bay, WI August 27 & 28, 2014. Three Child Passenger Safety (CPS) Advocates were recognized during the awards luncheon.

Each year Wisconsin Information Network for Safety recognizes an outstanding CPS Technician, CPS Instructor and CPS Program of the year that have been nominated by their peers/co-workers. The awards are in honor of Beth Kindschi of Monroe, WI who is a lead instructor and pioneer in the field of child passenger safety in Wisconsin and on a national level.

Motor vehicle crashes continue to be the number one cause of death and fatalities of children. Child Passenger Safety advocates promote the safe transportation of children by using child restraints and educating parent/caregivers on using car seats and boosters correctly.

CPS Technician of the year: Mary Waters, EMT/First Responder River Falls Ambulance Services has been a NHTSA certified Child Passenger Safety technician for 11 years. She was instrumental in developing the car seat safety program in West Central Regional Trauma Advisory Council and serves as an expert to many technicians who follow her lead.

CPS Instructor of the year: Patti Dickey (retired) Executive Director of Stevens Point Child Safety Center has been involved in Child Passenger safety for 32 years. She became a NHTSA CPS instructor in 2003 and provided over 500 car seat checks annually through the Portage County Child Passenger Safety Program and provided other safety initiatives.

CPS Program of the year: Safe Kids Wood County is a small coalition with programs and initiatives led by coalition members. Wood County developed one of the first diversion programs in the state of Wisconsin, which is collaboration with law enforcement of Wood County. Ticketed caregivers can attend a car seat checkup for education in lieu of paying a fine.

Each recipient was presented with a plaque at the luncheon.
*UPDATED* ATTENTION BOATERS
Posted 9/11/2014 by hgehrt@co.wood.wi.us
This project has been currently put on hold and the refilling of Dexter Lake has been started as of 09-11-2014. No further draw downs will occur this year.

Beginning on Tuesday, September 02, 2014, Dexter Lake will be lowered at a rate of 4 inches per day until the lake has been lowered a total of 3 feet.
The purpose of the water lowering is to enable the Department of Transportation to complete necessary repairs to the Highway 80 bridges adjacent to Dexter Lake.
During this time the boat landings may become unusable to boaters.
This project is scheduled to be completed by the end of September.
Food Safety Class
Posted 8/20/2014 by krauter@co.wood.wi.us
A food safety education class is being offered on the first week day of each month in Wisconsin Rapids and Marshfield. Interested persons must contact the Wood County Health Department prior to the class 715-421-8911.
Distinguished Public Health Employee
Posted 7/31/2014 by krauter@co.wood.wi.us
Congratulations to Amanda Melinski, Wood County's Distinguished Public Health Employee!

We recognize Amanda for her positive attitude, dependability, and outstanding work performance. Amanda has exceptional people skills and always displays a high standard of customer service, going above and beyond to seek out answers and resources for her clients. Her dedication, initiative and positive attitude radiates throughout the department.

The quality of work she produces is outstanding. Over the past two years, she has taken on many new tasks, welcoming new challenges and learning opportunities. She has embraced change and completed training in many areas, making her a strong asset to the teams she is a part of. As an exceptional team worker, Amanda is always willing to help others and do so with a smile. Doing all of the work she does takes extraordinary flexibility and time management skills.

We thank Amanda for her hard work and dedication as she strives to fulfill the mission and goals of the department. It is with great pride and honor that we commend Amanda for her accomplishments.
Spray Manure Irrigation
Posted 7/31/2014 by krauter@co.wood.wi.us
At the July 28, 2014 Health and Human Services Committee meeting at the Wood County Annex and Health Center in Marshfield, Nancy Eggleston, Environmental Health Supervisor gave a presentation on spray manure irrigation. The intent of the presentation was to provide Committee members with information about this agricultural practice-- what spray manure irrigation looks like, advantages and disadvantages, risk reduction methods, regulations, public concerns, and the State and local Health Department roles. To view this presentation, please see the link provided.
Housing Repair Loans
Posted 6/6/2014 by jgrueneberg@co.wood.wi.us
Are you in need of funding for home repairs but unable to secure a loan? If so, please consider applying for a Central Wisconsin Housing Region loan. The loans are available to:

• Low-to-moderate income (LMI) Wood County residents with owner-occupied homes.
• Owners of rental units in Wood County that rent to low-to-moderate income (LMI) tenants.

The Central Wisconsin Housing Region covers Adams, Green Lake, Juneau, Marathon, Marquette, Portage, Waupaca, Waushara and Wood County. The program administrator is the Juneau County Housing Authority. This is a program that was created to ensure the community’s ability to conserve, rehabilitate and improve residential properties occupied by low-to-moderate income (LMI) residents.

Click below to download the Central Housing Region Brochure.

For more information and application materials contact:

Central Wisconsin Housing Region
Program Administrator
Juneau County Housing Authority
717 E. State Street
Mauston, WI 53948
(608) 847-7309
juncoha@frontier.com

Courthouse Parking
Posted 4/16/2014 by webmaster@co.wood.wi.us
In April 2014, road construction began near the Courthouse at the intersection of Baker Street and Market Street.

As a result, access to the Baker Street parking lot has changed. Please refer to the attached map for details.
NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH WEEK • APRIL 7–13, 2014
Posted 4/7/2014 by krauter@co.wood.wi.us
National Public Health Week 2014: Overview

Since 1995, communities from across the country have participated in National Public Health Week. Every April, we come together to celebrate public health and renew our commitment to promoting a healthier nation using a unique theme to center the conversation. NPHW 2014 will focus on ways to guide the community through the evolving public health system with the theme: “Public Health: Start Here.”

As we invite communities to join NPHW 2014, let’s work to help them understand how public health affects their lives and offer guidance on how to navigate the changing system. Whether it’s through research, data collection, health education, policy change or direct services, public health lays the foundation and creates the conditions
that put healthy choices within reach. Let’s help our communities figure out where to start and how to access the variety of options made possible by public health.

A recent change that will impact the public health system is the enactment of certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Taking two U.S. health systems — public health and health care — and bringing them into each other’s world, the ACA envisions more collaboration between the health workforces to save lives and money. The ACA signals a shift in our nation’s health system from one that focuses on treatment of the sick to one that is committed to proactively keeping people and communities healthy and safe. Included in the historic law are comprehensive prevention provisions consistent with those called for by APHA in its health reform agenda and supported by other leading experts in population health.

National Public Health Week 2014 will fall at a critical time in the ACA process — just after the first Health Insurance Marketplace open enrollment period ends on March 31, 2014. This will be an important opportunity to rally stakeholders and members of our communities together around the value of public health. We need you to participate, and to remind your communities that public health professionals can help them navigate these changing times.
Wood County Outdoors!
WANTED....
Posted 8/1/2013 by hgehrt@co.wood.wi.us
Are you interested in Wildlife and what happens to it in our area? Do you want a way to voice your opinion on how it should be managed?
If so, then WE WANT YOU.....to join the Wood County Wildlife Area Advisory Committee.
This Committee currently has (1) opening for a 3 year term. This Committee meets 4 times a year in January, April, July, and October on a Tuesday evening at the Sandhill Wildlife Area.
If you are interested, please fill out the attached form and mail it back to the Wood County Park & Forestry Department.
Thanks!
Powers Bluff Long Range Plan
Posted 10/19/2012 by hgehrt@co.wood.wi.us
This is a .pdf file and is very large. It may take a few moments to download.
Pets In The Parks
Posted 6/28/2012 by hgehrt@co.wood.wi.us
Per our ordinance 600.08 (1) Pets.
-It shall be unlawful for any person to allow pets to enter any public building, bathing beach, picnic grounds, or playgrounds within any County Park, or to run at large at any time on County Park grounds.
-In other County Park areas and campgrounds pets are permitted provided they shall at all times be kept on a leash not more than 10 feet long. All pets shall be effectively restrained or under the owner's control at all times. No person shall allow his pet to deprive or disrupt the enjoyment or use of any area by others.
-Pet owners are required to immediately clean up after their pets.
Community Health Improvement Planning Process
Posted 5/4/2012 by krauter@co.wood.wi.us
The Wood County Health Department, in partnership with Ministry Saint Joseph's Hospital and Riverview Medical Center, is in the process of completing a Community Health Improvement Plan.

This process includes examining local county health data, identify local priority health areas, and identify community assets and resources.

Once our local priorities have been selected, community members will be asked to join implementation teams to assist in developing goals and objectives around these identified local health priority areas.

They will identify and develop evidenced-based strategies for the local health priorities, promote and implement these strategies, and evaluate the success of the strategies. Resources will be identified to mobilize the community to improve the health of Wood County residents.

We would like you to identify the Health Focus Areas that should be the priorities for the community for the next few years.

Considering the information (data) available on the Wood County Health Department website, the typed discussion points made by the Community Assessment Team, as well as your personal experience and insight, please complete the following survey.